Renaissance Series - Chemical Warfare

Additional Info

Beautiful soft delicate but deadly still life of White Hellebores.                 

This artwork is named after historic uses of the Hellebore plant.  I am interested in the links through the ages for uses of botanicals.  Hellebores literally translated, means 'lethal food'.  

One of the first documented uses of chemical warfare was during the Siege of Kirrha (mainland Greece) in 585 BC. Hellebore was reportedly used to poison the water system leading into the city, the residents fell ill and were no longer able to fight.  The Romans scattered the seeds of the Hellebores plant on their raids across the continent - a reliable source of poison if required. 

This series of work is influenced culturally by the Dutch Renaissance painters.   I am particularly interested in the way painters from this period used light and textures.  My passion for working with something organic and unpredictable is intuitive.  The series explores my passion for botanical studies.

There is a painterly quality that draws on the history and emotion.

Size: A1 - 841 x 594mm / Signed Edition of 5

Size A3 - 297 x 420mm / Signed Edition of 10

All Artworks are Printed on Archival Hanhemuhle Photo Rag 308gsm